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With the broader adoption of the internet around the turn of the century, how people would engage with and discover underground music would change forever. As a result of the new digital era, DIY was now worldwide, and no band embraced this new frontier better than Have a Nice Life. Formed in 2000 by duo Dan Barrett and Tim Macuga, the Middletown, CT-based pair would, throughout the 00s, self-release and share a number of demos and home recordings via early social media channels as well as establish it's in-house label Enemies List Home Recordings. These first steps set in motion Have a Nice Life's rise to renown as an icon of underground music in the internet age, culminating with the release of it's pivotal 2008 debut album, Deathconsciousness. Through word of mouth and online discussion, Deathconsciousness became subject to viral praise thanks to it's synthesis of bleak post-punk, lo-fi shoegaze, and carpets of hypnotic drone music. Eventually, this humble self-released project would attain the status of a post-internet cult classic, amassing Have a Nice Life a fervent online following that the band would interact with in kind. In an effort to thank and continue to engage with Have a Nice Life's internet cult following, Barrett and Macuga would regularly share links to old demos, works in progress, and outtakes from the recording of Deathconsciousness. Over time, a group of fans would compile these demos into an unofficial release. Dubbed Voids, this fan-made compilation several alternate takes of tracks from Deathconsciousness, as well as a handful of early versions of songs that would appear on Have a Nice Life's two following albums, The Unnatural World and Sea Of Worry. Fans swarmed around this compilation, accompanied by loud calls for it to receive a physical release. A tape pressing of Voids would be released via Music Ruins Lives, a DIY label run by Have a Nice Life superfan Thom Wasluck, also known for his band Planning for Burial. Between both instances of the tape swiftly selling out and the compilation's long absence from streaming services, Voids has historically been an elusive release to track down, only available in the obscurest corners of the internet or physically on the secondary market at eye-wateringly high prices.Over a decade since it's initial, unofficial release in 2011, The Flenser is proud to reissue Have a Nice Life's Voids for the first time ever in an official capacity in physical form.
With the broader adoption of the internet around the turn of the century, how people would engage with and discover underground music would change forever. As a result of the new digital era, DIY was now worldwide, and no band embraced this new frontier better than Have a Nice Life. Formed in 2000 by duo Dan Barrett and Tim Macuga, the Middletown, CT-based pair would, throughout the 00s, self-release and share a number of demos and home recordings via early social media channels as well as establish it's in-house label Enemies List Home Recordings. These first steps set in motion Have a Nice Life's rise to renown as an icon of underground music in the internet age, culminating with the release of it's pivotal 2008 debut album, Deathconsciousness. Through word of mouth and online discussion, Deathconsciousness became subject to viral praise thanks to it's synthesis of bleak post-punk, lo-fi shoegaze, and carpets of hypnotic drone music. Eventually, this humble self-released project would attain the status of a post-internet cult classic, amassing Have a Nice Life a fervent online following that the band would interact with in kind. In an effort to thank and continue to engage with Have a Nice Life's internet cult following, Barrett and Macuga would regularly share links to old demos, works in progress, and outtakes from the recording of Deathconsciousness. Over time, a group of fans would compile these demos into an unofficial release. Dubbed Voids, this fan-made compilation several alternate takes of tracks from Deathconsciousness, as well as a handful of early versions of songs that would appear on Have a Nice Life's two following albums, The Unnatural World and Sea Of Worry. Fans swarmed around this compilation, accompanied by loud calls for it to receive a physical release. A tape pressing of Voids would be released via Music Ruins Lives, a DIY label run by Have a Nice Life superfan Thom Wasluck, also known for his band Planning for Burial. Between both instances of the tape swiftly selling out and the compilation's long absence from streaming services, Voids has historically been an elusive release to track down, only available in the obscurest corners of the internet or physically on the secondary market at eye-wateringly high prices.Over a decade since it's initial, unofficial release in 2011, The Flenser is proud to reissue Have a Nice Life's Voids for the first time ever in an official capacity in physical form.
657628443223
Have A Nice Life - Voids [Remastered]

Details

Format: CD
Label: FLENSER
Rel. Date: 05/17/2024
UPC: 657628443223

Voids [Remastered]
Artist: Have A Nice Life
Format: CD
New: Available $15.98
Wish

Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Track 1
2. the Big Gloom
3. Track 3
4. Waiting for Black Metal Records to Come in the Mail
5. Track 5
6. the Future
7. Track 7
8. Earthmover
9. Track 9
10. Who Would Leave Their Son Out in the Sun?
11. Track 11
12. Human Error
13. Track 13
14. Trespassers w
15. Track 15
16. Defenestration Song
17. Track 17
18. I'm Dr. House
19. 1
20. Sisyphus
21. 1
22. Destinos

More Info:

With the broader adoption of the internet around the turn of the century, how people would engage with and discover underground music would change forever. As a result of the new digital era, DIY was now worldwide, and no band embraced this new frontier better than Have a Nice Life. Formed in 2000 by duo Dan Barrett and Tim Macuga, the Middletown, CT-based pair would, throughout the 00s, self-release and share a number of demos and home recordings via early social media channels as well as establish it's in-house label Enemies List Home Recordings. These first steps set in motion Have a Nice Life's rise to renown as an icon of underground music in the internet age, culminating with the release of it's pivotal 2008 debut album, Deathconsciousness. Through word of mouth and online discussion, Deathconsciousness became subject to viral praise thanks to it's synthesis of bleak post-punk, lo-fi shoegaze, and carpets of hypnotic drone music. Eventually, this humble self-released project would attain the status of a post-internet cult classic, amassing Have a Nice Life a fervent online following that the band would interact with in kind. In an effort to thank and continue to engage with Have a Nice Life's internet cult following, Barrett and Macuga would regularly share links to old demos, works in progress, and outtakes from the recording of Deathconsciousness. Over time, a group of fans would compile these demos into an unofficial release. Dubbed Voids, this fan-made compilation several alternate takes of tracks from Deathconsciousness, as well as a handful of early versions of songs that would appear on Have a Nice Life's two following albums, The Unnatural World and Sea Of Worry. Fans swarmed around this compilation, accompanied by loud calls for it to receive a physical release. A tape pressing of Voids would be released via Music Ruins Lives, a DIY label run by Have a Nice Life superfan Thom Wasluck, also known for his band Planning for Burial. Between both instances of the tape swiftly selling out and the compilation's long absence from streaming services, Voids has historically been an elusive release to track down, only available in the obscurest corners of the internet or physically on the secondary market at eye-wateringly high prices.Over a decade since it's initial, unofficial release in 2011, The Flenser is proud to reissue Have a Nice Life's Voids for the first time ever in an official capacity in physical form.
        
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